Multiple Myeloma

Multiple myeloma is a cancer that forms in a type of white blood cell called a plasma cell. Plasma cells help fight infections by making antibodies that recognize and attack germs.

Multiple myeloma causes cancer cells to accumulate in the bone marrow, where they crowd out healthy blood cells. Rather than produce helpful antibodies, the cancer cells produce abnormal proteins that can cause complications.

Treatment for multiple myeloma isn't always necessary for people who aren't experiencing any signs or symptoms.

cancer family: Adult Rare Haematological Cancers

Rare haematological malignancies affect less than 6 persons in 100 000 people and are arbitrarily defined as covering all malignant hemopathies.

These disorders represent a real challenge for clinicians, not only in terms of pathological diagnoses (now very complex with the integration of morphological, phenotypical, cytogenetical and molecular data) but also in terms of imaging (requiring true experts in the interpretation of 18FDGPET/CT scan) and in terms of therapeutic approaches (including chemotherapy, radiotherapy, immunotherapy, targeted therapy, transplantation and the management of curable diseases in older patients). Today, in order to guarantee optimal healthcare for the patient and thus the best overall survival rate, these malignant hemopathies require a comprehensive approach by a multidisciplinary team and access to the most modern therapies.

Approved treatment by the EMA

  • Bortezomib 
  • Carfilzomib
  • Daratumumab
  • Elotuzumab
  • Ixazomib
  • Lenalidomide
  • Panobinostat
  • Pomalidomide
  • Thalidomide

With varying degree of reimbursement, these treatments are reimbursed in several Member States.

How to use the data

Please note that the data available are only meant to inform you on the availability of a specific treatment in European Union Member States and the United Kingdom. However, the treatment might only be available in specific stages or settings of the disease. Please contact your doctor to discuss any questions you might have.

(The information above was obtained in September 2019, the latest update took place in February 2020)

PLease CLICK ON a country to find out about treatments and EUROPEAN REFERENCE NETWORKS (ERN) CENTERS OF EXCELLENCE IN THIS COUNTRY.
Austria0
Belgium5
Bulgaria2
Croatia0
Cyprus1
Czech Republic1
Denmark0
Estonia0
Finland0
France12
Germany4
Greece0
Hungary0
Ireland1
Italy21
Latvia0
Lithuania1
Luxembourg0
Malta0
Poland1
Portugal3
Romania0
Slovakia0
Slovenia0
Spain1
Sweden1
The Netherlands6
United Kingdom6

More useful information

Definition of European Reference Networks:

European Reference Networks for rare, low prevalence and complex diseases (ERNs) are virtual networks involving healthcare providers across Europe. They aim to facilitate discussion on complex or rare diseases and conditions that require highly specialised treatment, and concentrated knowledge and resources.

For more useful information on multiple myeloma, please visit the following links:

Patient organisations

Other useful links and information